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The Curse of Tippecanoe
The Curse of Tippecanoe
February 15, 2024

Out-spooking All Hallow’s Eve

Previously published Dec. 22, 2020
Out-spooking+All+Hallows+Eve

Previously published Dec. 22, 2020

Oh, to give a small child a mini-packet of high fructose corn syrup and extol their polyester costumes in the dead of night on my front porch! Oh, what a strange holiday Halloween is…

Not only does the concept of this age-old holiday sound off-putting, but insurance records also affirm these concerns. According to data acquired by Travelers Insurance in 2016, crime-related insurance claims spiked by 24% on October 31st, with property crime, namely vandalism, being the chief culprit. Halloween is also the only holiday for which government pages have safety guidelines; the National Safety Council warns that “costumes should be fire-resistant” and that children should “not eat any treats until they return home.” Elementary school kids certainly get an earful of the stranger-danger speech every October 31st.

Maybe the cancellation of trick-or-treating in many Bay Area cities isn’t so bad after all. Sure, the magic of it all may have dissipated a little, but why not watch a classic like the Addams Family, The Nightmare Before Christmas, or Ghostbusters with some close friends? What about baking bat-and-witch-themed treats with family? How about playing some hearty rounds of Among Us with the whole squad wearing pumpkin hats? Of course, the parades of vibrantly dressed children and insane piles of sugar will be missed, but you can still hang up haunting decorations and enjoy spooky treats this year! Here’s to hoping every Bobcat has a spook-tacular All Hallow’s Eve!

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Alice Zhou, Co-Editor-in-Chief

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